Farrier “hot shoeing” a horse

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Farrier cauterizing the hoof of a Trakehner mare. He heats the horseshoe in a small furnace (in his truck) and then shapes it on an anvil. Once it’s cooled a little, he puts the shoe on the foot to help seal it against dryness or moisture, as well as to determine to fit of the shoe, and I’m sure many other reasons. This particular shoe is a natural balance shoe.

Comments

Saartje05 says:

bullshit. If my horse doesn’t get horseshoes he can’t walk at all. What you’re saying that for thousands of years people are wrong, lol. Dumbass

pcc483 says:

Hoofrise says the same dumb comment on each farrier video.

SignoroIncognito says:

Hoofrise- you know nothing.
I have a horse which does not need shoeing- an imported Java pony. And I have a Bavarian horse which does- otherwise it will become lame.
Vets all say the Haflinger, like a finer horse such as a Hannover or English warmblood must be shod- he just is not able to develop tough hoof like the Java pony or say an Apaloosa, barb or Arabian.
Riding style (gait) and surface damages hoof more than a bad farrier.
Stupid dressage prancing has very much to answer for.

itwasallgoodinthe70s says:

BEWARE !!!! anyone thinking of attending the RED TOMLINSON school of horseshoeing, DON’T DO IT. RED IS A THIEF! He hides behind PO boxes,emails and cell phones so you can’t track him down once you give a deposit. He will NEVER call you back with a time or place to meet for your first class.

agenty1 says:

Yes nat they trim bears to!!!! Sorry I ment to say bare!! iPhones

agenty1 says:

Nat sorry about my stupid comment before, your right it has nothing to do with me and I was stupid to put that comment up!

I just get upset, becuase there are a lot of bear foot trimmers in England, and iv seen first hand what there poor training and knowledge can do to horse’s!

It was stupid of me to assume that you were one and please forgive me.

Have a good Xmas and a happy new year

Aaron

agenty1 says:

Sorry Nat that was out of order from me! Sorry. And your right about the start of my message! Have a good Xmas

Natalie Cruz says:

I’ve enough education to write a sentence with correct spelling and that at least makes sense. Besides, what person with any manners would begin a sentence with “What the hell” when writing to a total stranger?.  How sad. What I do has nothing to do with hell. Merry Christmas.

agenty1 says:

what the hell is a bare foot farrier did you get this qulification of the back of a corn flakes packet!!!

Natalie Cruz says:

The only time I’ve seen excessive wearing of hooves in on a dressage horse that was ridden on extremely soft surfaces only and always circling which is unnatural. His toes wore to the white line on the hinds but it did not cause unsoundness. It just didn’t look pretty. I actually recommended shoes to this client since she would not ride the horse on harder surfaces (to build callouses) to stop the excessive wear.

Natalie Cruz says:

Our horses are ridden on black top and we canter easily with no slipping, even if it is wet. There is never an issue of the hoof wearing down too much or at all.  The harder surfaces just do the trimming for me. We also show competitively in hunter shows, jumper shows and I barrel race and have never had a horse “wear down it’s hooves” because of use of any kind.

mikedilv says:

“Horse’s don’t need shoes” Really? Don’t horses that train for barrels, roping, reining, etc wear down their hooves faster than the growth restores them? Aren’t some horses prone to one of the three forms of interference and in need of intervention?

Natalie Cruz says:

I am a barefoot farrier so I’d disagree on many fronts. Technically, the horse wouldn’t feel the burned hoof but since horses don’t need shoes period, burning them on is just another crazy way to mess them up, in my opinion.

DogwoodTrace says:

Hot shoeing, if done correctly, does not hurt a horse; just like trimming hooves or putting shoes on.

Natalie Cruz says:

Ouch!

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